Father of MP’s suspected killer ‘despises terrorists’ after run-ins with Al-Shabaab

 

October 18, 2021

 

  • Ali Harbi Ali, 25, accused of stabbing David Amess to death on Friday
  • His father faced death threats from extremists while working for Somali government


A security source told the Daily Telegraph that Kullane was himself involved in countering extremist narratives while working with the Somali government. (AFP/File)

 

By Arab News

 

LONDON – The father of the suspect accused of murdering British MP David Amess is said to “despise terrorists” after being targeted himself with death threats by Somali extremists.

Ali Harbi Ali, 25, from London, is being held by police over the suspected murder of Amess on Friday.

Ali is estranged from his parents, the Daily Mail reported, and his father Harbi Ali Kullane is said to “despise terrorists” after his time working alongside the Somali prime minister before coming to the UK in 1996.

A security source told the Daily Telegraph that Kullane was himself involved in countering extremist narratives while working with the Somali government.

The source said: “He was quite involved in countering Al-Shabaab’s message in his role as comms director, and he received death threats from them for doing so, which is common for anyone involved in a high-profile position in the government.”

Ali was referred to Britain’s counterterrorism program five years ago after his teachers noticed his views becoming increasingly radical.

Estranged from his family, the young man was enamored with hate preacher Anjem Choudary, who had himself been jailed on terrorism-related charges until recently.

Choudary’s videos, his former friends told The Sun, turned Ali from a “popular pupil into an extremist.”

Kullane has reportedly been in contact with British security services, who are analyzing Ali’s phone and looking for an explanation as to his movements and thought processes ahead of the sudden attack.

Officials are reportedly not yet clear on why the man chose Amess as the target, but a government insider told the Daily Telegraph: “He was unlucky. He was not targeted because of his political party. David Amess was not specifically targeted.”

Amess, 69, was stabbed 17 times during the attack, which took place during his surgery — weekly open meetings in which politicians meet their local constituents.

The attack has raised questions in Britain over the effectiveness of its de-radicalization program Prevent, which was already under review after a string of other terrorist incidents.

There have also been concerns that the COVID-19 pandemic and its restrictions to daily life might have radicalized more individuals, as people are spending more time alone and online.

“Counter-terror police and MI5 have been concerned for some time that once we emerged out of lockdown there would be more people out on the streets and more targets for the terrorists,” a security source told the Daily Telegraph.

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